Raised Right - Alisa Harris

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by Holly Roberts
November 4, 2011
@harmonyholly
4 Stars
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Holly's overall score for this review: 5
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This book does a creative play on the title Raised Right. Either it means she was raised politically right, or she believes that she was raised right to eventually find out her own political beliefs. This book is a brave step in the world of a Christian publishing company though. Alisha Harris was raised in a Republican family, but as she grew up and got out on her own something began happening to her opinions. They changed as she began analyzing the world, and comparing it to what the Bible said about Jesus. Alisha Harris seems to be Democrat by the end of the book though she never clearly states it. I liked the refreshing viewpoints in this book. It gets you to thinking about how much Christians intertwine their faith to the world of politics, which in reality they shouldn't be. I think politics has ruined how people perceive what Christianity is about. Harris makes good points to support her new views, while still respecting the way her parents raised her. The book needs better transitions though. It switches back and forth between things that happened in her childhood to where she is now as an adult. I think it would have worked better if it read from childhood to adulthood. Though Harris provides good points for her her overall view she doesn't make exactly give any good ones for changing as she personally did. I think the balance between love, and acceptance still could have used better clarifying. Harris seems to have been raised in such a political family that it seems even as an adult, she needs to associate with one party or another to feel like her views are complete. There are some stories from Harris' childhood that are very intriguing, and if you don't consider yourself a Christian Republican then you'll highly relate to the book. I imagine someone who was strictly Christian conservative would be offended at her views. I remember being faced with the same questions Harris had though except unlike her it didn't take me until college to finally start asking them, and I wasn't raised in a family where politics defined me. I still have no political party I associate with. You can check out the book at Amazon.

I received this book from Waterbrook Multnomah in exchange for a review

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